Faq

Faq

RoHS is the acronym for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. RoHS, also known as Directive 2002/95/EC, originated in the European Union and restricts the use of specific hazardous materials found in electrical and electronic products. All applicable products in the EU market after July 1, 2006 must pass RoHS compliance.
The substances banned under RoHS are lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), hexavalent chromium (CrVI), polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE). .
The restricted materials are hazardous to the environment and pollute landfills, and are dangerous in terms of occupational exposure during manufacturing and recycling..
Portable RoHS analyzers, also known as X-ray fluorescence or XRF metal analyzers, are used for screening and verification of RoHS compliance.
Any business that sells applicable electronic products, sub-assemblies or components directly to EU countries, or sells to resellers, distributors or integrators that in turn sell products to EU countries, is impacted if they utilize any of the restricted materials.



WEEE is the acronym for Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment. WEEE, also known as Directive 2002/96/EC, mandates the treatment, recovery and recycling of electric and electronic equipment. All applicable products in the EU market after August 13, 2006 must pass WEEE compliance and carry the "Wheelie Bin" sticker.
WEEE compliance aims to encourage the design of electronic products with environmentally-safe recycling and recovery in mind. RoHS compliance dovetails into WEEE by reducing the amount of hazardous chemicals used in electronic manufacture.
Producers whose products are found to be non-compliant will be subject to fines and other severe penalties even to the point of being prohibited from doing business in the EU. Since the RoHS directive applies to "homogenous material" that is to say, materials of uniform composition throughout that cannot be manually broken down into smaller parts, OEM's must maintain a number of documents to verify compliance should their products come under the scrutiny of the governing authorities. A blanket statement may suffice for the consumer but the authorities will require substantiation which can come in many forms. There are two significant ways to show evidence of compliance. The most common and easiest to obtain is a supplier statement of compliance, however this must be provided on the part level and not merely as a generic statement for all materials supplied. In fact many OEM's will require statements for each item on the Bill of Materials (BOM) used to produce the components they purchase. However, if a component is suspect for any reason, OEM's will require analysis from product testing to certify its compliance; the second most common form of documentation. This may be done by the supplier or the OEM if the supplier is not willing. Suppliers who are not willing to provide compliant product or provide test data risk loosing their European market share.
Perhaps the most challenging of all the hurdles RoHS presents is the issue of quality. Some of the hazardous substances are in essential components and reworking them can compromise effectiveness. Some of the lead free soldering supplies for example require higher working temperatures taxing the circuit boards and may also have problems with lifting and whiskering making them more difficult to work with than their lead based counterparts. Not surprisingly, limiting fire retardant choices edges in on product safety requirements. While new alternatives are being developed, bridging the gap between the compliance deadline and new product availability is problematic.